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menstrual

‘That time of the month’, as we all generally hear it, is one of the most difficult things women handle each month. Periods happen because of the release of hormone from pituitary gland present in our brain and these hormones create an egg and at the same time lining of the uterus (womb) starts getting thicker but if the egg is not fertilized, the uterus lining starts breaking and blood and tissues get released. This breakage causes contraction of womb, which at times becomes painful, converting menstruation in to dysmenorrhea. Dysmenorrhea is a condition of menstruation involving pain and discomfort. Nearly 80% women experience it and 5% to 10% of them experience it up to a severe extent. In most of the cases, it is also observed that if a mother goes through it, the daughter too suffers from it.

Another terms related to this science is PMS-premenstrual syndrome. Physical and emotional changes that women go through one or two weeks before their periods are called PMS. Basically when the womb is about to shack its lining, we feel cramps in the lower abdomen and that causes irritation and mood swings. Some women also feel back pain and thigh pain. Location and intensity of pain varies from woman to woman but mild pain and irritation is common. Some women feel nausea and end up puking. This is usually observed among young or teenage girls.

Women in the mid-twenties or later experience heavy bleeding and pain during periods. However, on an average a women loses about a cup of blood every cycle. The rest of it is mucus and uterus lining. Acne, tender breasts, mood changes, and clots are a part of the menstrual cycle. At times, blood thinning doesn’t take place so clots are released. Again this is also normal and there is nothing to stress about except, the infections.

Pelvic infection or pelvic inflammatory disease occurs when a women’s reproductive organs are affected by sexually transmitted infections. Its symptoms are quite similar to menstruation and hence it is often neglected. This worsens the situation so visit your doctor if the pain in belly or pelvic area or bleeding is of high intensity.

Being safe is better than being sorry.

Pain and the tricks:
There are no sound and permanent solutions devised to bring complete relief from menstrual pain but here are some tricks that can make you feel better.
– A hot bath can be highly relaxing
– Massages can be of great help
– Avoid food having more of caffeine and salt
– Turn to tea, probably herbal tea
– Use a heating pad
– For natural healing: Use latest Electrotherapy

Try to avoid:
Smoking- It reduces the supply of oxygen to pelvic area, in turn intensifying pain
Alcohol- It can make your cycle go irregular
Sugary food- Higher the blood sugar levels, more painful the symptoms get

Say Yes To:
Yoga-

It relaxes your muscles, making the cycle more easy-going

Healthy food-

food

Having food that can maintain hormonal balance is advisable.